Talking courage with an Oncology Product Specialist

(~3 minute read.)

image3

Gina Saad is a Senior Oncology Product Specialist with extensive experience and outstanding sales, marketing and team leadership skills. With a Masters in Clinical Chiropractic and a decade of experience working in the pharmaceutical industry, Gina knows what it takes to succeed in challenging environments.

 Gina is a member of a group at Novartis Oncology aimed at Empowering Women to Impact Now and is a board member of a not-for-profit organisation known as Australian Egyptian Federation. She is an active member of her Coptic community and is passionate about empowering young members, helping them reach their full potential by running workshops to promote resilience, the power of having a growth mindset and building self-belief.

Outside of work she loves spending quality time with her family travelling the world, learning and experiencing different cultures.

Join us and realise just how passionate Gina is about empowering others through building courage.

How would you describe workplace courage?

I believe workplace courage is staying true to your values, speaking the truth, receiving/giving feedback and having honest open conversations with the right intent at all times. A courageous workplace allows its employees, no matter their title, to be vulnerable, make mistakes, fall, find a way to rise and get up again.

Courage is all about getting out of your comfort zone, being curious, taking risks, showing up, being seen as leaders of your organisation and not fearing failure.

What does courage look like in your workplace? 

Courage at my workplace is having a courageous leader who leads by example and believes that kindness and humility are essential traits of being a leader. A leader that truly believes that creating an “unboss” culture is key to the company’s success.

Recently, I presented a Novartisx talk on the power of courage to help encourage people to share their courage stories and make our company culture a courageous one; where all employees no matter their title can feel like they belong, be innovative and grow both personally and professionally.

Why? Because courage is contagious!

A courageous workplace allows its employees, no matter their title, to be vulnerable, make mistakes, fall, find a way to rise and get up again.

Please describe 1-2 examples in which you have been courageous.  What did you do?  Who/what enabled you to be courageous?  What was the outcome?  

My courage journey started in 2011 when I was so eager to get out of the cultural bubble I grew up and always lived in, and shift my perspective. I was hungry to learn and work on my self-love. So I planned a trip to South Africa and Zimbabwe with George my husband, in search of many new life lessons. I decided to conquer my fear, get out of my comfort zone, challenge myself mentally, physically, do the most dangerous wildlife tour in the world and walk with a lion which was part of a revolutionary conservation project. The opportunity to walk with these magnificent creatures was a mind blowing experience for me. There I met a humble man by the name of Hosea. It was his wise words, a quote he shared with me by Nelson Mandela, that helped me heal and made me realise that I am not perfect but I am good enough.

image2

Ever since, I have continued to choose courage over comfort. I participated in a panel discussion at my workplace to help shape our culture and had many courageous discussions about the importance of creating a safe environment for people to be curious, take risks, make mistakes and fail.

In 2018, I accepted a role on the board of the Australian Egyptian Federation and last year we organised the first ever women’s summit Educate, Empower, Embrace to celebrate Egyptian and MENA women; an event that I am proud of.

We identified a need to run this initiative for our community in Victoria because empowering women and integrating them as active participants in society is essential to promoting personal and economic growth. We ran a very successful summit and were able to achieve this by providing access to a wide range of leaders and valuable insights on various topics including; leadership, empowerment, entrepreneurship and wellbeing.

This summit was important to me because I believe that as women we need to spend time investing in ourselves, to learn how to fill our own cups first in order to become impactful courageous leaders in our lives, communities and society. When we empower each other and come together as a community we are so much stronger than we are alone.

So what have I learned throughout my courage journey?

Mindset is everything … be kind to yourself and have fun!

When we empower each other and come together as a community we are so much stronger than we are alone.

From your point of view, to what extent are Australia’s leaders leading with courage?

I believe there is an opportunity for our country leaders to be more courageous, to be bold with their decisions and to lead by their actions rather than their words.

When I think of a courageous country leader I think of Jacinda Ardern. Why? Because she is an empathetic leader that leads by example and says what she means. She is a strong, courageous, compassionate leader that puts her people first at all times. This was clearly evident when she unified her country after experiencing the most devastating shooting seen in New Zealand’s history.

If you would like to connect with Gina you can do so via LinkedIn or via her email at:  gina.saad85@gmail.com

image1


I met Gina when she participated in our 2019 #CourageConference.  I was so inspired by her mindset, strength, courage and her commitment to empowering others, that I wanted to share her story so that you too might be inspired to courage.

 @CourageChick

insium logo_interviews_blogs

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s